The premises

Since July 1970, the Luigi Einaudi Foundation has been based in the historical Palazzo d’Azeglio located in the centre of Turin, in via Principe Amedeo 34 courtesy of FIAT which owns it.

Palazzo d’Azeglio was built in 1679, according to the designs of Michele Angelo Garove, within the second city expansion plan, started by Amedeo di Castellamonte in 1673. The building was located in what was known as the “recinto nuovo di Po” (new district of Po), in an area shaped like a long and narrow rectangle, bordered by : in the north on the “contrada delle Marolles”, then called “del teatro d’Angennes”, Via Principe Amedeo today; in the east on the “di Santa Pelagia”, Via San Massimo today; in the south on the square called “Carlina” and the “contrada del Moro”, Via Des Ambrois today; in the west on other properties.

Since July 1970, the Luigi Einaudi Foundation has been based in the historical Palazzo d’Azeglio located in the centre of Turin, in via Principe Amedeo 34 courtesy of FIAT which owns it.

Palazzo d’Azeglio was built in 1679, according to the designs of Michele Angelo Garove, within the second city expansion plan, started by Amedeo di Castellamonte in 1673. The building was located in what was known as the “recinto nuovo di Po” (new district of Po), in an area shaped like a long and narrow rectangle, bordered by : in the north on the “contrada delle Marolles”, then called “del teatro d’Angennes”, Via Principe Amedeo today; in the east on the “di Santa Pelagia”, Via San Massimo today; in the south on the square called “Carlina” and the “contrada del Moro”, Via Des Ambrois today; in the west on other properties.

The building was modified several times but the most incisive works, which significantly mutated its aspect, were two. Above all the extension wanted by Ludovico Giuseppe Arborio di Gattinara e di Breme, who had bought the building from Francesco Amedeo Roero di Sanseverino e di Sciolze, in 1788. The marquise of Breme undertook radical extension and restoring work and commissioned it to Filippo Castelli. After some changes in ownership, the building was inherited by Roberto d’Azeglio who, in 1845, commissioned the restoration and the addition of a floor on the south façade by architect Barnaba Panizza.

The building was then bought by Giovanni Agnelli in 1919, on the occasion of the marriage of his daughter Tina with Carlo Nasi. In this occurrence the building complex was modified again but with limits to the disposition of the interiors. During the Second World War Palazzo d’Azeglio hosted FIAT’s Chairmanship and Budget Office and underwent damages, which were promptly restored. On August 6th, 1946 the building was formally “bound”, with ministerial notification, under law no. 1089 (June 1939) on the protection of historical and artistic heritage.

After inheriting the building, in 1953 Emanuele Nasi undertook further work to restore the internal planning according to the design of Tommaso Buzzi who changed, amongst other things, the old staircase of the northern wing into what is the current spectacular double twin sweeping staircase formed by the twisting of two spiral stair ways. On April 19th, 1968 FIAT purchased the building from Emanuele Nasi and hosted the main offices of Fondazione Giovanni Agnelli for a short time.

Some further work to restore the interiors took place in July 1970 when architect Amedeo Albertini oversaw the restoration project which allowed the settlement of the activities and the broad library of Luigi Einaudi Foundation in the building.
For a detailed history of the building download the reproduction of Palazzo d’Azeglio – una dimora signorile della vecchia Torino by Luigi Firpo (in Annali della Fondazione Luigi Einaudi, IV, 1970), Turin, 2011.